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Gortin Glen Forest Park

Gortin Glen Forest Park
Gortin Glen Forest Park
Gortin Glen Forest Park
Gortin Glen Forest Park
Gortin Glen Forest Park

We met with other home educating  families for a walk and picnic at Gortin Glen Forest Park.

The park has a number of different routes that you can choose from, each with a different distance and difficulty level. 

We chose to walk the River Walk which turned out to be quite steep in places and included bridges and stairs to cross the River.

We had a great time eating blackberries and finding pinecones that were eaten by squirrels. (Some of us had even been lucky enough to see some red squirrels when driving into the car park.)

After our walk we went for a picnic at the car park while the kids played.

It definitely is a place we would all like to go to again.

Currently parking is free but during the summer season it would cost £4 to park a car there.

There are public toilets which are open all year round.

Mourne Hiking

Mourne Hiking
Mourne Hiking
Mourne Hiking
Mourne Hiking
Mourne Hiking

On Wednesday 26th September, home educating families had an adventure in the heart of the Mourne Mountains. It was to be led by Paul but he decided to have his own adventure!!!

   Conrad came to the rescue and led us up Trassey Track, eventually leading to the steep rocky climb to Hare's Gap. In all, 500 feet elevation and over 4 miles hiking.

   Conrad, a frequent mountain walker, pointed out landmarks such as, Slieve Meelmore, Slieve Bearnagh (mainly covered in cloud), Luke's Mountain, Slievenaglogh and the Brandy Pad. We also learnt why and when the 22 mile Mourne Wall was built.

   Two hours after starting off we arrived at our stunning location, Hare's Gap, a most beautiful and tranquil spot where we had our lunch. The kids added their stones to the "We made it" stone mound, leaving their mark and having found their second wind began to explore the exciting terrain.

   On our descent we saw a farmer and his three sheep dogs expertly separating his "red" sheep from a flock of "green" sheep and herding them further up the mountain side. We found golden mushrooms and a furry caterpillar!

   A fantastic day was had by all and much applause for all the kids, especially the 5 year old one!!

   Roll on the next trek.

Dippy at the Ulster Museum

Dippy at the Ulster Museum
Dippy at the Ulster Museum

Two large groups of home educating families managed to be some of the very first people to privately see Dippy the Diplodocus Dinosaur when he arrived in Belfast yesterday as part of his road trip across the U.K. 

Dippy is road tripping from London around the U.K. for the first time since 1905. 

The 292 bone Skeleton cast is an impressive 21.3 meters long, arriving in 32 crates and taking a week to meticulously assemble. 

A stunning site that must be seen, that was enjoyed by all. 

The Ulster museum itself is impressive in it’s own right and families really enjoyed making the most of their trip by covering the museum floors. 

 

Alice in Wonderland Picnic

Alice in Wonderland  Picnic
Alice in Wonderland  Picnic
Alice in Wonderland  Picnic
Alice in Wonderland  Picnic

On Wednesday 5th September, home educators hosted an Alice in Wonderland picnic in Wallace Park, Lisburn for the ‘Not Back to School Week!’. 


Children were encouraged to read the fantastic Alice in Wonderland or listen for free through the Libraries NI site in the weeks before the picnic. 


Children helped to set up the scene - which caused many smiles from those passing by - and helped to pack up 3 hours later. In between, there was rock painting, hat and tee shirt decorating, stone stacking, clay modelling, space hoppering and lots of time for chat! 

People who help us!

People who help us!
People who help us!
People who help us!
People who help us!
People who help us!

Our home educated children had a very special treat this Friday morning.

 

Getting a look inside a fire engine and an ambulance! 

The fire service talked us through fire safety, the gear they wear and why they wear them.

 

Taking us around their engine and showing us everything they use in their varied work. 

Pizza Express Cooking class!

Pizza Express Cooking class!
Pizza Express Cooking class!
Pizza Express Cooking class!

A morning making pizza sounded like a wonderful idea at the time of booking, and though we had to book months in advance (popular those Pizza Express guys!) and brave rush hour traffic it was completely worth it. 

We were warmly welcomed with colouring packs, juice, tea and coffee on arrival in their cosy, inviting restaurant. The manager and staff throughout the cooking lesson were patient and very helpful. 

The kids were brought to their cooking station, donned their chef hats & aprons and got to work shaping their pizza dough with a helpful demonstration and hands on help throughout. 

Not Back to School week 2018

Not Back to School week 2018

Our annual not back to school week kicks off on the first week of September incorporating visits to see fire fighters and paramedics, a cooking class in Pizza Express, an Alice and Wonderland themed picnic, rock pooling and a train adventure to the Tower Museum! 

 

These activities are just a taster of what is to come for the Home Education community of Northern Ireland in 2018/19.

 

Home educators are encouraged to join our private facebook group where they can create and attend events.

We also look forward to our regular swimming, gymnastics and nature meets returning from the summer holiday.  

The Big Home Ed Picnic - a national celebration of learning

Some of the Children at the Belfast Picnic, posing by the trees and hanging aign
Some of the children at the Derry Picnic posing with the sign they made

As home educators all over the country celebrate learning with picnics and events we had two of our own in Northern Ireland.  In Belfast we celebrated in Wallace Park with food and circus skills!

”An excellent day was had at the Big Home Ed picnic in Wallace Park Lisburn. Home educators across the region came together to celebrate home education in the beautiful sunshine. 

The kids participated in a very fun circus workshop after a demonstration they got to learn how to use all of the props. 

Some kids also designed their own t-shirts. 

We ate lunch on our picnic blankets and took a walk down to the ice cream shack and playpark afterwards. 

It was a great chance to touch base with old friends and make new ones, both for the kids and the parents. 

A ‘aren’t we so lucky we home ed’ was a feature on my mind and many others I’m sure. What a fantastic community we have.”

In Derry we gathered at Brooke Park where we played football, enjoyed the playpark and rolled down the hill! We also made a sign with each letter coloured or collaged with feathers.

”We had a fanstastic day in the sunshine, it was such a fun and friendly atmosphere! 

As one of my kids said “home ed kids are the best, there’s always a good game to play”.

We had food, the blue tent(!), art, play and lots of laughter... “

Here’s to a lovely summer and many more picnics to come!

Musgrave vegetable garden

Musgrave vegetable garden

Our weekly meet at Musgrave Sensory garden has begun again. Our vegetable bed has been sown with peas, carrots, pumpkins, leeks, strawberries, red currents, blueberries and potatoes over the last few weeks. An activity that parents and children enjoy doing together. The idea being...you reap what you sow.

The inconspicuous water tap next to the allotment has been a source of many fun water fights. 

Just up the pathway is the beautiful musgrave sensory garden that boasts of a fantastic sand play area and playground. The forestry surrounding the playground and the story circle have been the source of lots of inspiration for the children’s games.

Our visit to the Wastewater Heritage Centre

HEdNI Kids at the Wastewater Heritage Centre

Today we visited the Wastewater Heritage Centre in Belfast. This is owned by NI Water.

First, we learnt about the sewage systems of the past.  The toilets in Roman times were quite hygienic as they had water running under them. It was not all good though, as the sewage ran into a river and polluted it, spreading diseases such as cholera.

The Medieval times were a bit better. If you were rich you had private toilets and the sewage plopped into a moat. The waste was then shovelled out of the moat by men and into a nearby river. The poor people used a bucket and threw their sewage on to the street. You just had to hope you weren’t passing by when a bucket was slopped out.

The Victorian times were better again. Sewers were available to the rich in the early Victorian era. The poor had to use privies, which were outside in their very small yards. The men who cleaned them were called the “Midnight Angels”, coming to clean them at night.

After learning about the history of our sewage system they told us about the 3 p’s, toilet paper, poo and pee. These are the only things which should be flushed down a toilet.

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